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Doing Well by Doing Good
Marketing and Management Science in the 21st Century
By Samuel Sewell Sewell   bestselfusa@gmail.com   (239) 591-4565

The business community in America has, at best, a tenuous grasp on the indisputable principle that honorable conduct is a prerequisite for abundant profit! Benjamin Franklin understood the benefits of enlightened and ethical business practices when he advised, “Do well by doing good.”  

Throughout the history of capitalism many entrepreneurs have prospered through application of this principle. A selected review of early industrialists makes the point that these entrepreneurs were driven by their own personal philosophy; that doing “good” for their people means that their business will also do “well.”

But it wasn’t until the 1960s that modern management science began to teach students that they can create stable wealth by doing “good” for their employees, their customers, and their communities. Finally, a fundamental truth that guides the creation of sustainable wealth was available to business students.

Today there is excellent data, both qualitative and quantitative, showing that a company’s successful relationship with people as well as ethical business practices is positively related to its financial performance.

Four scholars, from divergent fields, deserve the credit for developing the established principles that produce optimal wealth. Let’s take a brief look at these pioneers.

Maslow, Drucker, McGregor, and Nash is not a law firm. MDMN is an acronym created to serve as a reference point for this discussion on modern marketing and management science.

Abraham Maslow, through his books and teachings, brought us the psychology of business. The father of modern management, in his book, Maslow on Management, states that “The good society is one in which virtue pays.” In an ideal society prosperity is the natural consequence of “doing good.” 

Peter Drucker’s primary academic career was spent at Sarah Lawrence College. He also published 39 books on management which were translated into 30 languages. In 1995 Peter Drucker stated, “I became an immediate convert: Maslow’s evidence is overwhelming. But to date, very few people have paid much attention. He (Maslow) wrote Eupsychian Management to bring McGregor and me down to earth."  Here in the 21st century it remains true that very few people are aware of the contribution of MDMN.

Douglas McGregor, PhD in psychology from Harvard University, was a management professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management, where he created and developed the ' X' and 'Y' theories of human motivation and management.  These theories describe two contrasting models, coming from two opposing sets of general assumptions about workforce motivation. Theory X stresses the importance of strict supervision, external rewards, and penalties. It’s all about control by management. In contrast, Theory Y has a profoundly more profitable influence in the motivating role of job satisfaction, by encouraging workers to approach tasks without direct supervision.

McGregor’s book, The Human Side of Enterprise (1960) had a significant influence on the relationship between management and employees.  He pointed out that “The ingenuity of the average worker is sufficient to outwit any system of controls devised by management.” Like all natural systems, human behavior cannot be controlled; however it can be managed. McGregor went on to say that “Any attempt by management to enforce behavior that is contrary to human nature is preordained to fail. Conversely, management methods that compliment human nature are sure to provide wealth and well being for all concerned.”

John Nash, in the hit movie A Beautiful Mind, is at a bar with three other friends when he begins to develop a theory of what is now called Nash Equalibria, the idea that won him the Nobel Prize and the respect of his colleagues and loved ones, despite his schizophrenia.

At the bar, he and his three friends begin to compete for the beautiful blonde in a group of five women. “If we all go for the blonde” Nash says, “we block each other; not a single one of us is going to get her…and we insult the other girls. But, what if no one goes for the blonde? We don’t get in each others’ way, and we don’t insult the other girls. It’s the only way to win….the best result comes from everyone in the room doing what’s best for himself and for the group.”

 

The two most important conclusions gleaned from John Nash’s equations are;

1More profit is created through cooperation than through competition.

2. Nice guys finish first.

 

For more background we suggest becoming familiar with the works of Peter Drucker and Abraham Maslow, as well as Douglas McGregor, and find out why John Nash won the Nobel Prize for Economics in 1994.

One can hardly complete a business course on the college level without being introduced to the difference between the “X” and “Y” theories of management, as well as Maslow’s needs hierarchy. These classes however do not provide adequate familiarization with modern management science, nor do they really explain Maslow in relationship to management.

Most courses fail to convey adequately the idea that profits are maximized when respect for the “human side of enterprise” is obvious. Maybe an additional problem is that students of business do the same thing with their subjects that I did with Algebra. I did whatever math was necessary to graduate, and have never worked another algebra problem for the rest of my life.

While the MDMN ideas are slow to catch on, a small group of today’s upper echelon management professionals strive to find creative applications for these principles. Because of intellectual competition and academic hubris, the contributions of MDMN are rarely available in a single source, no matter what college you attend. Best Self USA management curriculum includes the contributions of MDMN in its marketing and management training program for individuals and organizations.  

I hope this helps remind business people of their college days, and encourages them to use proven profit enhancement principles based on “good guys finish first.”


In the 1970s Sam Sewell served on the faculty of Sterling College where he researched and created the Marketing and Management Science Curriculum.  Sam guided the core curriculum through the federal accreditation process based on scientific management principles developed by Abraham Maslow (Eupsychian Management), Peter Drucker (Drucker on Management), Douglas McGregor (The Human Side of Enterprise), and the work of John Nash, winner of the Nobel Prize for economics, who mathematically demonstrated that more wealth is created by cooperation than competition.

Dr. Bunny Sewell has owned her own private businesses as well as working for major corporations and governmental agencies. Her management and administrative skills as an educator emphasize the practical tools of supervising groups of people and task focused accomplishments.

Sam and Bunny have continued to expand their interest in the way behavioral sciences interface with executive and management functions, and frequently are asked to share their expertise on the corporate level in corporate seminars and in personal executive coaching.

Several executives who were private clients at Best Self USA saw the connection between human relations training done to facilitate harmony in families and the problems executives face in their business organizations. “My family seems to function like my business.” “I have started using what I learned about parenting and spousal communication skills with my employees.” “Would you teach these things to my supervisors?” Out of this need, Best Self USA created a curriculum to deliver to management personnel. Thus Drs. Sam and Bunny Sewell have been delivering private Executive Coaching to CEOs and business leaders for a number of years.

Doing Well by Doing Good - Marketing and Management Science in the 21st Century

Executive Coaching Program Syllabus


Private Executive Coaching Testimonials

The Executive Coaching was designed to improve an individual’s overall business acumen. Learning how to make the appropriate adjustments in verbal and non verbal communication helps when interacting and communicating with other people. This course made a lasting impression on me. Before this class, I was unaware that so much information about a person could be inferred just from listening to how they speak and carry themselves. Also, assertiveness is an essential quality that can help a person excel, especially in the corporate world. These are just some of the character traits that differentiate a leader and successful person from someone who does not progress. While the changes weren’t instant, I am gradually implementing the tools and skills taught throughout this course.

“Sam and Bunny are the BEST.”  I call this Executive Coaching Course the Boost to Success. I always feel energized when finish their coaching sessions!

Edeline Davis
Executive Administrative Coordinator

 

Dear Drs. Sewell,

About six months ago I asked you to work with one of our vice presidents to help him optimize his capabilities. I had specifically seen where this man, while knowing what to do, would not fully act on his instincts and execute what he knew was the necessary course of action. I had my suspicions as to why he kept stumbling on the finish line, and knew he needed the specific type of coaching you provide to remove the psychological barriers that result in truly great performance.

What a difference! Having been in management for over 35 years, I have seen my share of high achievers. I knew that buried inside this gentleman was a high achiever, and I was right. You have helped him tap his inner resources and have increased his value immensely to our company. The change is simply the single, most remarkable change I have ever had the pleasure to see in an individual. The speed of his metamorphosis is unlike anything I have ever seen. Six months! That is less than a hockey season to go from barely maintaining to high achiever. Unless I had witnessed this, I would have never believed it could be so quick.

I am so proud of him and grateful to you for helping him unlock his potential. Today he is pure energy and action in everything he does, right down to his tone of speech and the way he carries himself in the office. He acts and responds like the seasoned pro which indeed he was, but never fully acted like, before. I have watched a personality transformation right before my eyes.

Your Executive Coaching Program is one of the best investments I have ever made. I can't thank you enough and I guarantee you this gentleman will be thanking you for years.

Sincerely,

Tim Taylor
President
Network FOB, Inc

 

Here is another comment from a CEO who has completed the Executive Coaching program and has paid for other managers in his company to participate:

I came to Drs. Sam and Bunny Sewell for quite another reason than executive coaching in 2008. They treated me for an anxiety disorder, related to medication prescribed by a medical doctor, and for the strain it was putting on my family life. That was the beginning of our relationship.

The expansion into Executive Coaching began as we made progress on the anxiety. We already had tools to begin this, since my full spectrum personality evaluations had already been completed.

To begin with, they recognized that, as a businessman, I had overcome many adversities. We went, in depth, into the cognitive aspects of the dynamics used to solve business problems and make corporate decisions. Problem solving and decision making are intimately related to inspired thinking in a business person’s life. Most executives know what those break through moments are. They are known to many high achievers as the “Aha” moments; a true connection on all levels of who a person is, as a human being reaching above (way above) average results. The Sewells call them “peak experiences.”

We talked about brain chemistry, the amazing filing system hidden deep in the recesses of our synaptic core, and how to achieve those “Aha” moments more frequently, deliberatively and more “under command” than the sometimes seemingly random gifts that usually occur. Nutrition was also brought into focus as a leading contributor of both stress relief and superior cognitive reasoning.

Since my sessions, I have referred both personal friends and senior staff members to Best Self USA for both private and executive coaching. I know that they will benefit on several levels by learning to manage their reasoning and interaction patterns, and will gain fuller access to skills that will help them achieve elevated levels of success in their personal and corporate endeavors.

CEO Naples FL

 

Below is an article from a graduate of Best Self USA Executive Coaching Program

"The Keys to an Unstoppable Drive"

Sometime back in the mid 80’s I was invited to attend a sales seminar hosted by Don Beveridge. I was fortunate in that I got the chance to sit in on the seminar and I found it to be a memorable experience. He was motivated, and his motivational sales points were strong. The ideas he shared with the audience, with a little bit of license on my part, went something like this: You wake up at 5am. From 5-7am you plan your day, every hour. Be in the office by 7am and by 9am get out, prospect and be in the community. At 5pm get back to the office to do your follow-up with all of your prospective clients. From 7-9pm you do your administrative work. After that, get into bed so you’re ready for 5am again. I heard at least two old saws proclaim, “This guy is nuts.” I thought so too, but in a good way.

There were about 200 sales people in attendance, many of whom were inspired by his ideas. And my guess is that many of the salesmen (there weren’t many women selling in those days) took action after that day because they wanted his results. So they probably started getting up at 5am, and arrived at the office by 7am, and they started making the cold calls they normally had not been making. But pretty soon, within a few days or weeks, most would probably stop and resume their old ways. Their activity levels went back to normal. Why? Because their productivity rose above their self-image and their self-image squashed their productivity back down within their comfort level; a level consistent with their self-image. They took an afternoon off here and there, maybe they watched Oprah, maybe Jerry Springer; hung out in a bar commiserating with other business cohorts, it’s hard to say why. It could be that their actions were becoming inconsistent with their self-image.

Today many will talk about balance in life. Those are thoughts best left to the idealists, and to those who believe the system is rigged, and that we ought to spread the wealth. I believe there is a place for balance all right; mine is in balancing the checkbook and my family life. Making a difference in your life and the lives of those who depend on you is, in its own sense, the important balance. The checkbook and family unit satisfaction are only the scorecards. If your checkbook and family life is where you think it should be, you’re doing fine and don’t need to go further, unless you think you can, in which case you haven’t set you goals high enough.

You will always perform at a level equal to your self-image. Our self-image is the portrait we have of our self; it is the image we have created about our self, and is commonly based on past experiences and environmental influences. So if a new desire for improvement is introduced and it conflicts with our current self-image, it is doomed to fail. I guess I was fortunate in that I had a very successful family and couldn’t envision anything other than success.

Our actions, behaviors, and yes our discipline, are all heavily influenced by our self-image. Even if you force yourself via will power to do things beyond your self-image, you won’t be able to sustain it for very long. You will go back to the old behaviors consistent with your own self-belief, because you believe it, and you act from this belief. What caused the Ali’s, Jordan’s, and the Annika Sorenstams of the world to work as hard as they did? What causes the top 1% in selling to consistently sustain their mind-boggling activity levels? Answer for all: their self-image. If you watched Tiger’s meltdown in the last couple of years and its subsequent effect on his golf course performance, you can see what a blow to self-esteem can do, even if it was of his own making.

Major changes occur in income, production and satisfaction for the average salesperson (in fact all people) when they understand the importance of evaluating, changing and elevating their self-image. Managers and salespeople comfortable with small and average client sizes, but nervous and fearful with the high-end clients, who learn to grow their self-portrait, become more confident and succeed in the large client arena. Let’s not get into a discussion about which type of client you can make the most money on, because you can make plenty off big clients if you set it up right; and if you set it up right, it won’t be you doing the clerical work.

Speaking of clerical work; executives who are most comfortable working clerical tasks instead of leading a group of managers and clerical workers are destined to confine themselves to a mid-level manager’s wage. Not that there is anything wrong with mid-level management or clerical work. If that is what you want to be good at, then be the best. There are many hourly pay rates in business; the highest belong to those who can lead other people in a desperate charge to the top. Job satisfaction is relevant to the position desired and the execution of satisfying your self-image. Life satisfaction is relevant to that self-image, and the life to which that image confines us.

As we raise our self-image we also raise our expectations, behaviors and the discipline we bring to our activities. Learning to change behavior permanently is one of the most important skills a person can develop in their life. Without this skill, any self-improvement intention will result in failure and frustration. All we need to do is to change the portrait by investing time and energy, with guidance, through learning.

Our self-image is held in our subconscious mind. This is the inside part of our brain where all of our habits and beliefs are stored. Many estimates in the field of psychology suggest that we are only utilizing a small part of our brain - generally 5% to 10%. Which means that nearly 90% is untapped and waiting to serve us. Our subconscious mind is this under-utilized resource. It’s the part of the brain that allows our body to do things naturally and consistently with an ease and proficiency that our conscious mind could never match.

Great things that seem impossible become possible when we learn to communicate to and from our subconscious mind. Here’s how: when thoughts and feelings match, and are focused on over and over again, they become accepted by the subconscious mind. When we add pictures or visualization, which match these thought/feeling combinations, we are actually changing our self-image with a new self-belief. We communicate to our self image in pictures, hence the term self-image. When such ‘visualized thought with feeling’ intention is accepted by the subconscious mind it becomes a belief that executes itself automatically.

Follow these steps to a new level of discipline by changing your self-image:

Step one: DECIDE exactly what you want. This is critical. Are you after a habit change or a new goal? Whatever it is, be crystal clear on the outcome you desire.

Step two: DETERMINE the activities that will lead to this outcome. This is an easy step; just determine what you would need to be doing in order for this result to come naturally. It is simple cause and effect. For this step, make sure you choose activities that you could see yourself doing. There are often many paths to an outcome. Avoid the activities that don’t fit your personality, and make sure the ones you do choose will facilitate your goal.

Step three: INVEST 20 minutes a day in focused quiet time, Ten minutes in the morning and 10 minutes in the evening. Here is the place you need to invest the time and energy. In this time, find a quiet place in which you will not be interrupted and close your eyes. With eyes closed, put your attention on the goal. With thoughts on the goal, see yourself doing these activities with ease, day in and day out.

Picture yourself becoming proficient at these activities. Bring more and more clarity into the picture every time you do this. Visualize the time of day and the reaction from those around you; the more detailed the better! And finally, feel the feelings you would experience, as you would engage in these activities; also feel the feelings, with intensity, that you would undergo upon accomplishing this goal. See yourself actually doing the deal!

Successful, productive people produce record results because of their belief in themselves. They grew their self-image by this ‘visualized thought with feeling’ process. Many probably didn’t even realize they were doing it. Whether they intended to or not doesn’t really matter, because this is how it works, and it can work for anyone.

Step four: APPLY this process and remember the importance of vivid images and concentrated feeling. Do this and you’ll never again have to be stuck in undesirable patterns from your past. With new information can come new results.

We’re only here for a visit. If you want to make a difference, you already have. “There is nothing as tantalizingly close as a dream.

Tim Taylor
CEO Network FOB
Graduate of Best Self USA Executive Coaching Program

Contact infos@bestselfusa.com to discuss fees for Executive Coaching

The business community in America has, at best, a tenuous grasp on the indisputable principle that honorable conduct is a prerequisite for abundant profit! Benjamin Franklin understood the benefits of enlightened and ethical business practices when he advised, “Do well by doing good.”  

 

Throughout the history of capitalism many entrepreneurs have prospered through application of this principle. A selected review of early industrialists makes the point that these entrepreneurs were driven by their own personal philosophy; that doing “good” for their people means that their business will also do “well.”

 

But it wasn’t until the 1960s that modern management science began to teach students that they can create stable wealth by doing “good” for their employees, their customers, and their communities. Finally, a fundamental truth that guides the creation of sustainable wealth was available to business students.

 

Today there is excellent data, both qualitative and quantitative, showing that a company’s successful relationship with people as well as ethical business practices is positively related to its financial performance.

 

Four scholars, from divergent fields, deserve the credit for developing the established principles that produce optimal wealth. Let’s take a brief look at these pioneers.

 

Maslow, Drucker, McGregor, and Nash is not a law firm. MDMN is an acronym created to serve as a reference point for this discussion on modern marketing and management science.

 

Abraham Maslow, through his books and teachings, brought us the psychology of business. The father of modern management, in his book, Maslow on Management, states that “The good society is one in which virtue pays.” In an ideal society prosperity is the natural consequence of “doing good.” 

 

Peter Drucker’s primary academic career was spent at Sarah Lawrence College. He also published 39 books on management which were translated into 30 languages. In 1995 Peter Drucker stated, “I became an immediate convert: Maslow’s evidence is overwhelming. But to date, very few people have paid much attention. He (Maslow) wrote Eupsychian Management to bring McGregor and me down to earth."  Here in the 21st century it remains true that very few people are aware of the contribution of MDMN.

 

Douglas McGregor, PhD in psychology from Harvard University, was a management professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management, where he created and developed the ' X' and 'Y' theories of human motivation and management.  These theories describe two contrasting models, coming from two opposing sets of general assumptions about workforce motivation. Theory X stresses the importance of strict supervision, external rewards, and penalties. It’s all about control by management. In contrast, Theory Y has a profoundly more profitable influence in the motivating role of job satisfaction, byencouraging workers to approach tasks without direct supervision.

 

McGregor’s book, The Human Side of Enterprise (1960) had a significant influence on the relationship between management and employees.  He pointed out that “The ingenuity of the average worker is sufficient to outwit any system of controls devised by management.” Like all natural systems, human behavior cannot be controlled; however it can be managed. McGregor went on to say that “Any attempt by management to enforce behavior that is contrary to human nature is preordained to fail. Conversely, management methods that compliment human nature are sure to provide wealth and well being for all concerned.”

 

John Nash, in the hit movie A Beautiful Mind, is at a bar with three other friends when he begins to develop a theory of what is now called Nash Equalibria, the idea that won him the Nobel Prize and the respect of his colleagues and loved ones, despite his schizophrenia.

 

At the bar, he and his three friends begin to compete for the beautiful blonde in a group of five women. “If we all go for the blonde” Nash says, “we block each other; not a single one of us is going to get her…and we insult the other girls. But, what if no one goes for the blonde? We don’t get in each others’ way, and we don’t insult the other girls. It’s the only way to win….the best result comes from everyone in the room doing what’s best for himself and for the group.”

 

The two most important conclusions gleaned from John Nash’s equations are;

 

1. More profit is created through cooperation than through competition.

 

2. Nice guys finish first.

 

For more background we suggest becoming familiar with the works of Peter Drucker and Abraham Maslow, as well as Douglas McGregor, and find out why John Nash won the Nobel Prize for Economics in 1994.

 

One can hardly complete a business course on the college level without being introduced to the difference between the “X” and “Y” theories of management, as well as Maslow’s needs hierarchy. These classes however do not provide adequate familiarization with modern management science, nor do they really explain Maslow in relationship to management.

 

Most courses fail to convey adequately the idea that profits are maximized when respect for the “human side of enterprise” is obvious. Maybe an additional problem is that students of business do the same thing with their subjects that I did with Algebra. I did whatever math was necessary to graduate, and have never worked another algebra problem for the rest of my life.

 

While the MDMN ideas are slow to catch on, a small group of today’s upper echelon management professionals strive to find creative applications for these principles. Because of intellectual competition and academic hubris, the contributions of MDMN are rarely available in a single source, no matter what college you attend. Best Self USA management curriculum includes the contributions of MDMN in its marketing and management training program for individuals and organizations.  

 

I hope this helps remind business people of their college days, and encourages them to use proven profit enhancement principles based on “good guys finish first.”